To the Perpetrator: If a tree falls in the woods does it make a sound?

Rubik's Cube in scrambled state

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You isolated my three biggest strengths as creative problem solving skills, communication skills and consultation skills. You were praising my creative problem skills. Systematically giving approval for creative problem solving won’t strengthen those skills at all. The only way to teach creative problem solving is by setting an example of seeing problems as opportunities. Anything else is ineffective.

You represented a reputable firm when I met you. That firm is a nationwide name in real estate. Business consultants were attempting to teach agents to apply a certain innovation. Indecently, the fact that pricing appropriately and doing the basics of marketing and consultation well is considered an innovation is bizarre, but I digress. Anyway, you had no confidence in your ability to apply that material and you did have confidence in my ability to apply it. Obviously, you had absolutely no business trying to teach me anything about communication or consultation. You should have been asking me questions!

Here is an underlying problem with all of your selections. None of these are specific skills. They are all skill sets. You build the skill sets one skill at a time. You are doing a process that most people can’t feel in a way that is completely ineffective.

If a tree falls in the woods does it make a sound?

By the way, the answer is no.

To my Mentor: I’ve reduced Bennis to a Tweet!

a table about human ethical charactristics

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Hey, Bennis is Tweetable.

It goes like this, “The ethical decision is always the right decision even when it’s an F’ing pain in the ass!”

It’s unfortunate that the firms founder didn’t think of that while she was ignoring and neglecting the situation. Obviously, I have a great deal more that that to say to you but I have a few matters to attend to first!

Quick note to readers: “Workplace Issues” is a work of creative nonfiction based on my true story of being bullied. It’s told in a series of open letters.

 

To Legal and PR: I’ll answer this one in advance and up yours!

Screw (Kotoko song)

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One stunt that you would probably like to pull is saying that I clearly don’t understand the seriousness of my allegations because I’m using humor in my blog.

I studied English and not business. This is a work of creative non-fiction.

If it isn’t entertaining then no one will read it.

Also, I’m passionate about my cause and this might be effective marketing. Things that are unique and outlandish often get attention on the net.

And by the way, up yours! Your firm should have simply adhered to law!

To The Perpetrator: Your judgment was inaccurate and your behavior was predatory.

A mantis eating a bee. Location: Saitama, Japan

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You informed me repeatedly that I have a, “challenge with setting and respecting boundaries.”

Your observation was inaccurate. I’m neither abusive nor a passive victim.

However, you perceived a weakness. The only person who has literally disrespected every major boundary that I have set with them is you. And, in order to be effective at keeping me in a disrespectful relationship you had to literally cause me a state of duress. This isn’t acceptable professional behavior.

Exploiting a perceived weakness is predatory.

Quick note to readers: “Workplace Issues” is a work of creative nonfiction based on my true story of being bullied. It’s told in a series of open letters.

 

To The Perpetrator: Every voice matters including mine! (language warning)

WASHINGTON (March 26, 2010) A poster supportin...

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Every voice matters including mine, mother fucker!

You and the entire management team counted on my silence. As little as a decade ago a woman’s only option was the mainstream media.

Guess what, modern technology makes it exposing the truth simple!

I may well go to the main stream media also. But, I’m taking this excellent opportunity to illustrate the point.

The primary reason that women remain silent about harassment and assault is fear or retaliation. Frequently we fear the company or educational institution as badly as the perpetrator, and for excellent reason. In “Transparency” Warren Bennis observes that the ease of publishing that the blog sphere provides makes a lot of the ways that companies traditionally retaliated ineffective.

Moreover, I have a little fucking news flash for you. What the public wants is to see the silence around sexual assault, sexual harassment and domestic abuse broken. And, most people don’t like people like you, at all!

It’s worthy of note that this is tagged comedy and creative non-fiction. My best guess is that the average world citizen will find it amusing.

Some might even respect me for it!

Quick note to readers: “Workplace Issues” is a work of creative nonfiction based on my true story of being bullied. It’s told in a series of open letters.